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Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa
Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies
Teaching Documents about Palaeontology and Palaeoecology
Teaching Documents about Ichnology
Teaching Documents about Ecology
Teaching Documents about Taphonomy
Teaching Documents about Plant Anatomy
Teaching Documents about Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Research
Teaching Documents about Botany
Teaching Documents about Biology
Teaching Documents about Evolution
Teaching Documents about Mass Extinction
Teaching Documents about Classification and Phylogeny
Teaching Documents about Cladistics
Teaching Documents about Palaeogeography
Teaching Documents about Palaeoclimate
Teaching Documents about Stratigraphy and Historical Geology
Teaching Documents about Geochronological Methods
Introductions to Statistics
Meta Indexes of Online Education
Virtual Field Trips
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Home / Teaching Documents, Lecture Notes and Tutorials / Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany


Categories
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany

What is Palaeobotany?
General
Focused on the Evolution of Plants
Early Land Plants
Renowned Palaeobotanists
Palaeobotanical Maps
! Paleovegetation Reconstructions@
Fossil Animal Plant Interaction@
Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Research@
Teaching Documents about Botany@
Cuticles@
Permineralized Plants and Petrified Forests@
Fossil Charcoal@
Coal Petrology@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Trees@
Image Collections@
Picture Search@















Home / Teaching Documents, Lecture Notes and Tutorials / Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany / What is Palaeobotany?


Categories
General
Focused on the Evolution of Plants
Early Land Plants
Renowned Palaeobotanists
Palaeobotanical Maps
! Paleovegetation Reconstructions@
Fossil Animal Plant Interaction@
Palaeobotanical and Palaeontological Collections@
Fossil Protection@
Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Research@
Teaching Documents about Botany@
Cuticles@
Permineralized Plants and Petrified Forests@
Fossil Charcoal@
Coal Petrology@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Databases focused on Palaeobotany and Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@
Directories focused on Palaeobotany@
Bibliographies mainly focused on Palaeobotany@


What is Palaeobotany?

Richard Bateman, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh: Palaeobotany: The study of fossil plants.

Paleobotanical Section of the Botanical Society of America: Executive Summary: Paleobotany.

britannica.com. Paleobotany.

Peter R. Crane, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew: Paleobotany: back to the future. Abstract.

William A. DiMichele, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington: Love's Labour Lost? Or the tragic story of a young paleontologist who chooses fossil plants as his life's work only to discover at age 50 that his mother thinks he should have studied dinosaurs ("Why aren't you ever on TV?"). From PALAIOS, Volume 13.5; October 1998.

Robert A. Gastaldo, Department of Geology, Colby College, Waterville, Maine: A Brief Introduction to PALEOBOTANY, and WHAT IS PALEOBOTANY? Navigate via: Notes for a Course in Paleobotany.

Joseph Hall: Paleontologica. For those people who are interested in the field of Palentology. Go to: Paleobotany.

! Hans Kerp, Palaeobotanical Research Group, Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster: Some recent palaeobotanical text books. This web page provides a selection of palaeobotanical text books published during the last years. With some helpful comments.

Una R. Smith, Department of Biology, Yale University: The Future of Paleobotany (or, How am I driving?) From: The PaleoNet Forum: A Monthly Electronic Journal, January, 1996: Volume 2, Issue 1.











Home / Teaching Documents, Lecture Notes and Tutorials / Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany / General


Categories
What is Palaeobotany?
Focused on the Evolution of Plants
Early Land Plants
Renowned Palaeobotanists
Palaeobotanical Maps
! Paleovegetation Reconstructions@
Fossil Animal Plant Interaction@
Palaeobotanical and Palaeontological Collections@
Fossil Protection@
Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Research@
Teaching Documents about Botany@
Cuticles@
Permineralized Plants and Petrified Forests@
Fossil Charcoal@
Coal Petrology@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Databases focused on Palaeobotany and Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@
Directories focused on Palaeobotany@
Bibliographies mainly focused on Palaeobotany@


General

! Nan Crystal Arens, C. Strömberg and A. Thompson, Department of Integrative Biology, and Paleobotany Section, Museum of Paleontology (UCMP), University of California at Berkeley: Virtual Paleobotany. The Virtual Paleobotanical Laboratory, a comprehensive treatment of the fossil record of land plants, is divided into 12 chapters, lab I through XII. Each lab has a title page, a page with questions around the group or subject of study, a list of literature and links for further reading and exploration, and a virtual gallery of images from the lab. The directory page is a generalized phylogeny that presents an overview hypothesis of relationships among the land plants. Excellent!

Amanda Ash, Department of Paleobiology Smithsonian Institution NHB, Washington, DC; Beth Ellis, Boulder, CO; Leo J. Hickey, Division of Paleobotany, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University New Haven, CT; Kirk Johnson, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Denver Museum of Natural History, Denver, CO; Peter Wilf, University of Michigan, Museum of Paleontology, Ann Arbor, MI; Scott Wing, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution NHB,Washington, DC: Manual of Leaf Architecture (PDF file). ISBN 0-9677554-0-9, Copyright by Smithsonian Institution. Published and distributed by the Leaf Architecture Working Group (LAWG). (Page hosted by the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University). The main goal of this manual is to define and illustrate for the reader an unambiguous and standard set of terms for describing leaf form and venation, particularly of dicots. This manual also provides a template and set of instructions that show how descriptive information can be entered into a standardized database of fossil and extant leaves.

The Botanical Society of America: Online Image Collection. This is a collection of approximately 800 images available for instructional use. The site is run by a search engine database, designed and maintained by Scott Russell; slides scanned by Tom Jurik and Dave Webb. The copyright and any intellectual property rights for these images are retained by the individual donors. Visit SET 11 - PALEOBOTANY. Paleobotany section slides contributed by John Hall.

Sean Carrington, Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Barbados: THE PLANT KINGDOM. An introduction to the world of plants from an evolutionary perspective. Now complete!

C. J. Cleal & B. A. Thomas: A Provisional World List of Geosites for Palaeozoic Palaeobotany. This a new project initiated by the IUGS to develop an inventory of globally important geological sites. GEOSITES provide a provisional list of candidate Palaeozoic palaeobotany sites. The results are summarized in 40 sites, which are intended to show the broad pattern of evolution in land floras from the middle Silurian to the end of the Permian.

Bruce Cornet, Paleobotany, Plant Evolution, Sirius Onion Works: Angiosperm Evolution.

J. Folsom, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, CA: Plant Trivia Timeline. The Timeline gives world history from the viewpoint of a botanist. It is the story of plant discovery and use, and addresses the roles of plants in human civilization.

Robert A. Gastaldo, Department of Geology, Colby College, Waterville, Maine: A Brief Introduction to PALEOBOTANY, and WHAT IS PALEOBOTANY? Navigate via: Notes for a Course in Paleobotany.

Michael D. Guiry, Department of Botany, University College, Galway: Plant evolution, growth, anatomy and reproduction.

Hooper Virtual Natural History Museum (HVNHM), Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Ottawa: Carboniferous Forests. Easy to read publication. Life, death, and afterlife of a coal forest.

Hans Kerp, Palaeobotanical Research Group, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster: A History of Palaeozoic Forests. An introductory text with many helpful links directly related to the history of Palaeozoic forests. 7 chapters provide information about: The earliest land plants; Towards a tree-like growth habit; The earliest forests; The Carboniferous coal swamp forests; The floral change at the end of the Westphalian; Stefanian and Rotliegend floras; Is there a floral break in the Permian?

! Hans Kerp, Palaeobotanical Research Group, Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster: Some recent palaeobotanical text books. This web page provides a selection of palaeobotanical text books published during the last years. With some helpful comments.

Research Centre of Palaeontology and Historical Geology: Institute, States Collections, and Museum of Palaeontology and Historical Geology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München: Online Exhibition "Living Fossils". Go to: Handfarne, Ginkgos und Mammutbäume, and Walter Jung, Der Ginkgo - Baum, ein Unikum mit Vergangenheit, and Walter Jung, Die Metasequoia, ein zum Leben erwecktes Fossil. In German.

Nature Science Update (December 8, 1999): One for the Vine. "A prickly climbing vine", Vasovinea tianii (Gigantopteridales), that lived more than 250 million years ago could shed light on the origin of flowering plants.

nature science update: relics: Fall put leaves on trees. Beerling, D. J., Osborne, C. P. & Chaloner, W. G.: Evolution of leaf-form in land plants linked to atmospheric CO2 decline in the late Palaeozoic era. Nature 410, 352–354 (2001).

Karl Niklas, (Section of Plant Biology, Cornell University), Access Excellance, BioForum 4, "Theoretical Issues in Plant Biology". BioForum is a series of lectures, presented by California Academy of Sciences, in which scientists share their research results with high school biology teachers. Plant Evolution: Adaptation or Historical Accident? Is plant evolution largely adaptive or is it contingent on historical accidents? Dr. Niklas discuss in some detail a computer generated model dealing with the early evolution of land plants that can be used to predict how plant architecture must change to assure evolutionary success as the environment changes.

Kevin C. Nixon, L.H. Bailey Hortorium, Cornell University Ithaca, NY: Paleobotany in cladistics and cladistics in paleobotany: enlightenment and uncertainty. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Volume 90, Issues 3-4, February 1996, Pages 361-373.

Department of Horticulture and Crop Science in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University: Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew: Plant Evolution. Images of models to represent extinct plant forms with modern versions of 'primitive' plants, the entire display conveyed in dramatic fashion the dramatic change in plant form over the ages.

Paul E. Olsen, Matt Gompper, and Kevin Griffin, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia College, Columbia University, Palisades, NY: The Life System and Environmental & Evolutionary Biology II, The Life System Syllabus. The "Life System" component provides an integrated view of the biological component of the Earth system. It emphasizes the history of life, biogeochemical cycles, biodiversity, evolution, ecology, and physiology at the microbe to global scale. It also stresses the biotic systems, in contrast to the physical systems, as maintaining the non-equilibrium state of the Earth's surface. Go to: The Life System: Lecture 7 - The Paleozoic, the Rise of Plants, and the Age of Dinosaurs.

Paleogeographic Atlas Project, University of Chicago: Jurassic Floras and Climate.

Gar W. Rothwell, Department of Environmental and Plant Biology Ohio University, Athens: Cutting a Coal Ball, and Coal Ball Peel Technique. Part of the Paleobotany course.

George E. Schatz, Missouri Botanical Garden: Malagasy/Indo-australo-malesian Phytogeographic Connections. From the printed version: Schatz, G.E. 1996: Malagasy/Indo-Australo-Malesian phytogeographic connections. In: W.R. Lourenço (ed.), Biogeography of Madagascar. Editions ORSTOM, Paris.

Christian Scheuer, Institute of Botany, Karl-Franzens-University Graz: Skriptum zur Vorlesung Pflanzenverbreitung, Klima und Erdgeschichte. Go to chapter 4, "Floren- und Vegetationsgeschichte" (in German).
Chiefly from FREY, W. & R. LÖSCH 1998: Lehrbuch der Geobotanik. Pflanze und Vegetation in Raum und Zeit. – Stuttgart, (G. Fischer), and SCHROEDER, F.-G. 1998: Lehrbuch der Pflanzengeographie.

BookRags Inc.: BookRags was launched with the idea to create a web site providing classic literature study guides entirely free for students. Interesting in terms of science history. Go to: A.C. Seward (1909!), Darwin and Modern Science. See: D.H. Scott, The Palaeonotological record, Plants.

Robert A.Spicer and the Palaeoenvironmental Research Group (A.B.Herman, P.M. Rees, E. M. Kennedy), Earth Sciences Dept., The Open University, Milton Keynes: Plants as Climatic Indicators.

Robert A. Spicer, Earth Sciences Dept., The Open University, Milton Keynes: Palaeobotany Lectures. Four lecture introductions: Lecture 1: "On the Beach", Lecture 2: "Living off the Land", Lecture 3: "Form, Function and Sex in Ferns and Conifers", and Lecture 4: "Angiosperms: Their Life and Times". The Web Pages provide material, mostly images, that complement the lecture notes.

R. A. Stockey, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta: PALEOBIOLOGY OF ANGIOSPERM ORIGINS. This course explores recent advancements toward resolution of the evolutionary origin of flowering plants. It will be conducted in a seminar format in which the course instructor, several guest paleobotanists, and each student will present a topic of interest. The course will also coordinate closely and be interactive with a companion course in Paleobotany that is being taught simultaneously at Ohio University.

Ralph E. Taggart, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology/Department of Geological Sciences at Michigan State University, East Lansing: BOT335 Lecture Schedule. Some interesting chapters in terms of palaeobotany, e.g. The First Vascular Land Plants;
Carboniferous Forests;
Arborescent Lycopods;
Psaronius: a Carboniferous tree-fern;
Carboniferous Horsetails;
Carboniferous Seed Ferns;
The Evolution of Conifers;
Cycadophytes, the True Cycads;
Mesozoic Cycadeoids;
Ginkgophytes;
North American Redwoods, Past and Present;













Home / Teaching Documents, Lecture Notes and Tutorials / Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany / Focused on the Evolution of Plants


Categories
What is Palaeobotany?
General
Early Land Plants
Renowned Palaeobotanists
Palaeobotanical Maps
! Paleovegetation Reconstructions@
Teaching Documents about Evolution@
Teaching Documents about Mass Extinction@
Fossil Animal Plant Interaction@
Palaeobotanical and Palaeontological Collections@
Fossil Protection@
Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Plant Anatomy@
Teaching Documents about Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Research@
Teaching Documents about Botany@
Cuticles@
Permineralized Plants and Petrified Forests@
Fossil Charcoal@
Coal Petrology@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Coal Petrology@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Databases focused on Palaeobotany and Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@
Directories focused on Palaeobotany@
Bibliographies mainly focused on Palaeobotany@


Focused on the Evolution of Plants

Richard M. Bateman, Peter R. Crane, William A. DiMichele, Paul R. Kenrick, Nick P. Rowe, Thomas Speck, and William E. Stein: EARLY EVOLUTION OF LAND PLANTS: Phylogeny, Physiology, and Ecology of the Primary Terrestrial Radiation.- Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1998 29: 263-292. Full Online Access via Annual Reviews, Go to Annual Reviews Search Page (Biomedical Sciences), Search for "Bateman" (Field Author, Last Name).

Museum of Paleontology (UCMP), University of California at Berkeley, Plantae, Fossil Record: Chart of First Appearances of Major Plant Groups. Each of the taxonomic plant groups in pink boxes can be clicked upon to take you to an introduction.

Robert A. Berner, Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut: The Rise of Plants and Their Effect on Weathering and Atmospheric CO2

britannica.com: plant, Evolution and paleobotany.

britannica.com: angiosperm. Paleobotany and evolution.

! Stephen P. Broker, Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute: The Evolution of Plants. The evolution of plants is briefly treated primarily in terms of a consideration of the concepts of time and change, and an appreciation of the great diversity of life on earth today (without images). Recommended for Biology, 9th and 10th grade level, and Botany, 11th and 12th grade level.

David D. Cass, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta: Earliest Evidence of Flowering Plants. 32 slides. Center for Astrobiology, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA: PALEONTOLOGY (Winter 2001). Lecture overheads and color slides. Go to: Lecture 12: Origin and Evolution of Land Plants.

Philippe Choler, Laboratoire de Biologie des Populations d'Altitude, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble: Biologie Evolutive Végétale. Concepts and methods in evolutionary biology (in French). Navigate from "Plan du cours" (access to about 335 slides). Go to: Quelle est l’origine des Angiospermes?

James A. Doyle: PHYLOGENY OF VASCULAR PLANTS.- Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1998 29: 567-599. Full Online Access via Annual Reviews, Go to Annual Reviews Search Page (Biomedical Sciences), Search for "Doyle" (Field Author, Last Name).

ForestWorld.com, Inc., Colchester, VT: Woods of the World Online. Detailed information on up to 910 wood species and products. Examine the common names, common uses, distribution, environmental profile, physical and woodworking properties, and mechanical values of all these woods. Imagine a wood book with 3,000 pages of text. Free of charge, but registration procedure required.

Division of Biological Sciences, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA: Bio 108, Some key factors in the evolution of plants, culminating in the flowering plants. A number of important factors in the evolution of land plants.

Robert A. Gastaldo, Department of Geology, Colby College, Waterville, Maine: Plant Associations of the Mesophytic. Lecture Notes.

Thomas J. Herbert, Department of Biology, University of Miami: Plants onto land - The algae through the gymnosperms. Part of Biology 160 - Evolution and Biodiversity.

Christoph Heubeck, Sabine Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen Götze, Ulla and Michael Schudack, David Völker, Christoph Dobmeier, Joachim Müller, Henry Wuttke and Henriette Peters, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Freie Universität Berlin: Die Erde. An introduction to Geosciences. Go to: Die Entwicklung der Pflanzenwelt (in German).

Kenneth G. Karol, Richard M. McCourt, Matthew T. Cimino, and Charles F. Delwiche, Science Magazine: The Closest Living Relatives of Land Plants. This analysis supports the hypothesis that the land plants are placed phylogenetically within the Charophyta, identifies the Charales (stoneworts) as the closest living relatives of plants.

Uwe Kaulfuß, Technische Universität, Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany: Geologisches Oberseminar 2000/2001, Charakterisierung der Eroberung des Festlandes als Habitat. In German (PDF-file)

Hans Kerp, Palaeobotanical Research Group, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster: A History of Palaeozoic Forests. An introductory text with many helpful links directly related to the history of Palaeozoic forests. 7 chapters provide information about: The earliest land plants; Towards a tree-like growth habit; The earliest forests; The Carboniferous coal swamp forests; The floral change at the end of the Westphalian; Stefanian and Rotliegend floras; Is there a floral break in the Permian?

Michael Knee, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio State University: General Plant Biology, Horticulture and Crop Science 300, Online Resources. Go to: ANTHOPHYTA I, Evolution of flowering plants, and Plant Evolution, or Evolution.

Klaus Ulrich Leistikow, in cooperation with Franziska Kockel, Palmarum Hortus Francofortensis: On the Phylogeny of Plants - a Didactic Model. Abstract, in German and English.

Nature (Macmillan Publishers), Feature of the Week: Flowers and foliage.

Daniel L. Nickrent, Department of Plant Biology and Center for Systematic Biology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; Christopher L. Parkinson and Jeffrey D. Palmer, Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington; R. Joel Duff, Department of Biology, University of Akron: Parsimony and likelihood analyses of genes from all three subcellular genomes strongly support major land plant phylogenetic relationships. Article with illustrations.

Dan Nickrent and Karen Renzaglia, Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale: Land Plants Online, Phylogenetic Relationships Among Land Plants - Overview. This page is designed to show the trees derived from various studies giving only the details of four termimals: tracheophytes, mosses, hornworts and liverworts. In other words, these diagrams are meant to show various competing hypotheses on the most basal relationships among land plants.

Barry A. Palevitz, "Discovering Relatives in the Flowering Plant Family Tree". The Scientist, Volume 13, 1999: Search for: "flowering plant". Registration procedure required.

Kathleen B. Pigg, Department of Plant Biology, Arizona State University: Plant Fossils and Evolution. The objective of this course is to give an overview of the importance of the fossil record to our current understanding of plant evolution. Navigate from the Syllabus page, go to the table of contents below in the "REVISED LABORATORY SCHEDULE".

Authored by the The Rhynie Chert Research Group, University of Aberdeen, with contributions and support by the Palaeobotanical Research Group, University of Münster, Germany, the Centre for Palynology, University of Sheffield, The Natural History Museum, London, and The Royal Museum, National Museums of Scotland: The Biota of Early Terrestrial Ecosystems, The Rhynie Chert. A resource site for students and teachers covering many aspects of the present knowledge of this unique geological deposit (including a glossary and bibliography pages). The website´s second part provides guidance for teachers in this subject area and as such will require a password to enter (obtainable from the authors).

Gar W. Rothwell, Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens: Angiophytes: Using Whole Plant Concepts to Interpret Angiosperm Origins.

C. Schirarend and R. Vogt, Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum, Berlin-Dahlem: Von Nacktpflanzen und Schuppenbäumen - ein Streifzug durch die Entwicklungsgeschichte der Pflanzen. Part of the description of the exhibition "Stammesgeschichte der Pflanzen" (in German).

Bruce H. Tiffney (University of California, Santa Barbara), Access Excellance, BioForum 4, "Theoretical Issues in Plant Biology". BioForum is a series of lectures, presented by California Academy of Sciences, in which scientists share their research results with high school biology teachers. The Influence of Plants on the Evolution of Terrestrial Communities. "The Influence of Plants on the Evolution of Terrestrial Communities" is a tour de force through some 450 million years of plant evolution, giving you a feeling for the life forms based on sequential evidence of the fossil records and a consideration of the climates and major physical events that prevail.

Scott L. Wing and Lisa D. Boucher: ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE CRETACEOUS FLOWERING PLANT RADIATION.- Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 1998 26: 379-421. Full Online Access via Annual Reviews, Go to Annual Reviews Search Page (Biomedical Sciences), Search for "Wing" (Field Author, Last Name).








Home / Teaching Documents, Lecture Notes and Tutorials / Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany / Renowned Palaeobotanists


Categories
What is Palaeobotany?
General
Focused on the Evolution of Plants
Early Land Plants
Palaeobotanical Maps
! Paleovegetation Reconstructions@
Places of Palaeobotanical Research@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Search for Palaeobotanists, Botanists and Palaeontologists@
Databases focused on Palaeobotany and Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@
Directories focused on Palaeobotany@
Bibliographies mainly focused on Palaeobotany@


Renowned Palaeobotanists

britanica.com: Brongniart, Adolphe-Théodore.

Susan Sheets-Pyenson, Department of Philosophy, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec (page provided by GeoClio): John William (Sir William) Dawson: Geologist and Educator. Dawson has been called the grandfather of Paleozoic paleobotany in North America (Geological History of Plants, 1888). Reprinted from GSA Today, September 1998. See also http://www.ednet.ns.ca/educ/museum/fossils/finders/dawson.htm

Nachlass-Sammlung, Library, University of Graz, Austria: Constantin von Ettingshausen (1826-1897). See also Images concerning Constantin von Ettingshausen, and his list of correspondence (all pages in German).

Jerzy Piotr Majchrzak: Nadbobrzañska Szprotawa (in Polish). Scroll down to: Heinrich Robert Göppert. Portrait drawing.

Palaeobotany Section, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Manchester: Palaeobotany at Manchester. A brief history, Thomas Maxwell Harris (1903 - 1983).

T.D.A. Cockerell (1998), World Wide School, Seattle, WA: A Visit to Oeningen. About Oswald Heer (amongst others).

Paul R. Janke, Pan Terra Inc., Hill City, SD: History of Geology.

britannica.com: Robert Kidston.

Chrisopher Kaftan, Student Reports, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Professionals in Science: Leo Lesquereux.

Clark Kimberling, University of Evansville, Evansville, IN: Leo Lesquereux (1806-1889) paleobotanist.

Inez Ramsey, James Madison University, the Internet School Library Media Center Paleontologists Page (ISLMC): Paleontologists for K-12. The ISLMC is a meta-site where teachers, librarians, parents and students can preview curriculum related materials, e.g. Leo Lesquereux (1806-1889), America´s first paleobotanist.

Center for History of Science. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences' Research Institute for the History of Science: Picture of Alfred Gabriel Nathorst.

Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontological Research, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg: Portrait of Dr. Edna Plumstead.

Anonymus, Jain Computer Consultants, http://www.exciteasia.com: FASCINATING FOSSILS - PALAEOBOTANY. Biographical contribution about Professor Birbal Sahni. See also Professor Birbal Sahni, FRS. (from The Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow).

Library, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH): Johann Jakob Scheuchzer (1672-1733). In German.

Johannes Jacobi Scheuchzeri (1723): HERBARIUM DILUVIANUM. Plant fossils chiefly from the Carboniferous, Permian und Tertiary. Reproductions of the original plates (in German and Latin). From "Klassiker der Biologie im Internet", part of "Botany online - The Internet Hypertextbook", by Alice Bergfeld (she is the English editor), Rolf Bergmann, University of Hamburg, and Peter v. Sengbusch, University of Bielefeld and Institut für Allgemeine Botanik, University of Hamburg.

Clendening Library Portrait Collection, Johann Lucas Schönlein (Schoenlein).

britannica.com: Scott, Dunkinfield Henry.

The Geological Society of London: From the Archive. Scroll down to: Sir Albert Charles Seward (1863-1941).

britannica.com: Stebbins, George Ledyard. American botanist and geneticist known for his application of the modern synthetic theory of evolution to plants.

Österreich-Lexikon: Caspar Graf Sternberg, Lithography by J. Kriehuber, 1837 (Bildarchiv der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek, Wien).
See also: Antiquariaat Junk, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: STERNBERG, K. M. VON. Versuch einer geognostisch-botanischen Darstellung der Flora der Vorwelt. Leipzig, Prag, Regensburg, Fleischer/ Brenck, (1820-) 1825-1838. Detail picture page.

National Museum Prague, Czech Republic: Palaeontological Collections, Hall 2 - Sternbergeum, Portrait of Count Caspar Sternberg.

Palaeobotany Section, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Manchester: Palaeobotany at Manchester. A brief history, Marie Carmichael Stopes (1904-1911).

The Family Education Network, Infoplease: Marie Carmichael Stopes.

Österreich Lexikon: Franz Unger, 1800 - 1870. Short biographical entry (in German). Lithography by A. Dauthage. See also:
Antiquariaat Junk, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: UNGER, F. Chloris protogaea. Beiträge zur Flora der Vorwelt. Leipzig, in Commission bei W. Engelmann, (1841)-1847. Detail picture page.

Grad HVAR, Hungary: Franz Unger (1800-1870) physician and professor of (palaeo)botany from Graz.

Institute of Plant Physiology, University of Vienna: Franz Unger. Vienna's "first true plant physiologist", was a true all-rounder with a profound knowledge in anatomy, physiology, ecology, pathology and, last but not least, in palaeobotany.

Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven: "Who Was Who" at the Peabody Museum, George Reber Wieland (1865-1953).

George Reber Wieland, (photograph). Go to: Vincent L. Santucci, National Park Service, Kemmerer, WY, and Marikka Hughes, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Paleobotany Division, New Haven: Fossil Cycad National Monument: A Case of Paleontological Resource Mismanagement.

Palaeobotany Section, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Manchester: Palaeobotany at Manchester. A brief history, William Crawford Williamson (1851-1892).

britannica.com: Williamson, William Crawford. English naturalist, a founder of modern paleobotany.


See also:

dmoz: Society: History: By Topic: Science: Geology. The Open Directory Project is the largest, most comprehensive human-edited directory of the Web.

Dennis O'Neil, Palomar College, San Marcos, California: Early Theories of Evolution, Related Internet Sites, Biography Links.

MSN (Microsoft Corporation). Similar to Inktomi (HotBot): Web Directory, Library, Sciences, Earth & Environment, Earth Scientists.

Michon Scott, Strange Science. The rocky road to modern palaeontology and biology. Worth checking out: Timeline. A chronology of some important events in the history of paleontology and biology.










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This index is compiled and maintained by Klaus-Peter Kelber, Mineralogisches Institut, Universität Würzburg,
e-mail
k-p.kelber@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de
Last updated February 05, 2002

Argus Clearinghouse approved.